Cancer Research Society

402 - 625 President-Kennedy Avenue
Montreal, QC H3A 3S5
President & CEO: Manon Pepin
Board Chair: Francois Painchaud

Charitable Reg. #:11915 3229 RR0001

STAR RATING

Ci's Star Rating is calculated based on the following independent metrics:

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✔+

FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY

Audited financial statements for current and previous years available on the charity’s website.

B

RESULTS REPORTING

Grade based on the charity's public reporting of the work it does and the results it achieves.

n/r

DEMONSTRATED IMPACT

The demonstrated impact per dollar Ci calculates from available program information.

NEED FOR FUNDING

Charity's cash and investments (funding reserves) relative to how much it spends on programs in most recent year.

58%

CENTS TO THE CAUSE

For a dollar donated, after overhead costs of fundraising and admin/management (excluding surplus) 58 cents are available for programs.



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Programs

About Cancer Research Society:

Founded in 1945 in Montreal, Cancer Research Society (CRS) raises money to fund research on prevention, detection and treatment of all types of cancer. CRS highlights that one in two Canadians is diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. 

Cancer Research Society distributed $14.3 million in cancer research grants and scholarships in F2019, a 10% decrease from just under $16 million in F2018. Of total funding, 54% went to research on cancer treatments, 25% to research on causes and prevention, and 20% to research on detection. CRS has two core funding programs: operating grants and strategic initiatives. It also offers scholarships for next generation scientists and launched its new UpCycle program in 2018 that funds drug repurposing research.

Operating grants were 52% of research funding in F2019. This program funds basic, early translational, and environmental cancer research. Each grant is $120,000 over two years. In F2019, Cancer Research Society received 407 funding requests from researchers and selected 70 new research projects to fund. With 69 sustained research projects also funded during the year, CRS supported 139 research projects in total (up from 129 in F2018).

Strategic initiatives were 42% of research funding in F2019. CRS funds large-scale, collaborative research projects in tandem with partners such as Canadian Institute of Health Research, Merck Canada, and Canadian universities. The charity reports funding 37 initiatives in F2019. Notable new initiatives include: a $12 million research initiative with Oncopole (a research hub based in Montreal) to support seven oncology research projects involving over 60 researchers at 12 research organizations; and a partnership with Polytechnique Montreal on a new radiotherapy technique for liver cancer that uses artificial intelligence to improve targeted removal of cancerous tumours while protecting surrounding organs.

The remaining 6% of research funding went to scholarships and UpCycle. Cancer Research Society’s scholarships are for new researchers completing their fellowships. Each scholarship is $170,000 distributed over three years. In F2019, CRS awarded four new scholarships and continued funding for seven sustained scholarships. UpCycle, which started in F2018, is a grants competition for drug repurposing projects. These projects explore the possibility of using existing cancer treatments in novel ways to develop new therapies faster and cheaper. CRS funded 5 projects through this program in F2019.   

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Results and Impact

In its most recent F2019 annual report, Cancer Research Society reports significant improvements in cancer survival rates for multiple cancer types, sourced from Statistics Canada. The largest improvement seen is in pancreatic cancer – the national survival rate improved to 8% from 5% (a 68% improvement) between 1992-94 to 2012-14. CRS does not disclose how much of its research funding goes toward pancreatic cancer.

Dr. Noel Raynal’s team at CHU Saint-Justine, supported by a $100k UpCycle grant in F2018, discovered a potential new use of proscillaridin A for treating aggressive leukemia (which is the second leading cause of childhood cancer death in Canada). The drug is traditionally used for cardiac diseases, and the team's results are published in the Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research.

Dr. Francis Rodier and his team at CRCHUM, supported by a $120k operating grant, discovered a new treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in 2019, termed the “one-two punch.” The treatment targets the aging process of cancer cells. It has two stages: the first step stops the cells from multiplying, and the second step kills the now ‘senile’ cells to eliminate the cancer. These results were published in Nature Communications Journal. Pre-clinical models involving ovarian and breast cancer patients are testing this treatment method to confirm its effectiveness.

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Finances

Cancer Research Society is one of Canada’s Major 100 charities, meaning it is one of the country’s largest in terms of Canadian donations. It received just under $29m in donations in F2019. Administrative costs are 5% of total revenue (excluding investment income) and fundraising costs are 36% of total donations. For every dollar donated, 59 cents go to cancer research, which is outside Ci’s reasonable range for overhead spending.

Administrative costs associated with managing research grants are presented as program costs. In F2019, it cost CRS 3 cents to manage each dollar of research grants made that year, which is a strong grant management ratio.

CRS holds $38.5m in funding reserves, including $122k in donor-endowed funds. Excluding endowments, the charity’s reserves can cover annual grants spending for two years and seven months.

CRS reports annual research grant and fellowship commitments in its audited financial statements. The charity has committed to distributing $21.0m (52% of funding reserves) over the next five years: $12.8m in F2020, $6.3m in F2021, $863k in F2022, $75k in F2023 and $20k in F2024.

CRS’s five largest grants in F2019 went to McGill University ($991k), University of Laval ($939k), University of Montreal ($905k), Jewish General Hospital ($624k), and BC Cancer Agency ($600k).

This charity report is an update that has been sent to Cancer Research Society for review. Comments and edits may be forthcoming.

Updated on May 19, 2020 by Katie Khodawandi.

Financial Review


Financial Ratios

Fiscal year ending August
201920182017
Administrative costs as % of revenues 5.3%4.7%7.6%
Fundraising costs as % of donations 36.4%32.8%38.2%
Total overhead spending 41.6%37.5%45.8%
Program cost coverage (%) 258.9%211.1%265.9%

Summary Financial Statements

All figures in $000s
201920182017
Donations 28,95228,48218,962
International donations 1287199
Government funding 98141346
Investment income 1,6882,4911,058
Total revenues 30,86531,18720,465
Program costs 484538414
Grants 14,34915,96511,330
Administrative costs 1,5381,3471,479
Fundraising costs 10,5249,3507,238
Total spending 26,89427,19920,460
Cash flow from operations 3,9713,9875
Capital spending 11520443
Funding reserves 38,50434,94731,326

Note: Ci obtained government funding and international donations figures from the charity’s T3010 CRA filings and backed the amounts out of donations. Grants include gifts to qualified donees and research grants and scholarships as reported in the T3010 CRA filings.

Salary Information

Full-time staff: 29

Avg. Compensation: $72,728

Top 10 staff salary range:

$350k +
0
$300k - $350k
0
$250k - $300k
0
$200k - $250k
1
$160k - $200k
0
$120k - $160k
1
$80k - $120k
4
$40k - $80k
4
< $40k
0

Information from most recent CRA Charities Directorate filings for F2019

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Comments & Contact

Comments added by the Charity:

Cancer Research Society provided these comments to a previous report. New comments may be submitted.

"The mission of the Cancer Research Society is to fund research on all types of cancer throughout Canada. Through its operating grant program, the Society primarily supports fundamental or basic research. Fundamental research answers the why, what and how of cancer. It leads to essential knowledge that serves as the cornerstone for innovative discoveries. The Society also funds translational research, which takes discoveries from the laboratory and brings them to the patient in the form of better diagnostic tools and treatments. Last but not least, the Society, finances projects aimed at understanding the environmental causes of cancer, a field in which it is considered to have played a pioneering role in Canada.

With the goal of expanding its research portfolio and leveraging donor funds, the Cancer Research Society partners with individuals, families, groups, and other cancer organizations by creating scientific alliances and targeted Research Funds. These partnerships allow enhanced funding of research on:

  • various types of cancer (prostate, breast, pancreas, lung, ovary, myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, etc.);
  • late effects of childhood cancer treatments;
  • personalized medicine; and the
  • environmental causes of cancer.

In addition to operating grants, and through its Scholarships for the Next Generation of Scientists program, the Society provides young researchers with the opportunity to pursue their careers in Canada. This unique and innovative funding initiative serves to prevent an exodus of our best scientific minds.

During the past five years, the Society has invested $62.3 million in research and has funded 335 new research projects on cancer throughout Canada.

The Cancer Research Society has been funding research since 1945. Since its creation, there have been many advances in cancer detection, prevention and treatment. Guided by the highest standards and an uncompromising commitment, the Society aims to exceed expectations in research. 

For more information: www.CancerResearchSociety.ca"

May 25, 2018: For more information on how funding reserves, among others, is calculated: https://www.charityintelligence.ca/research/charity-profiles

Charity Contact

Website: www.crs-src.ca
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Donors can contact Cancer Research Society at 1.888.766.2262 or at 514.861.9227

Tel: 514 861-9227

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